It is a constitutional isomer of dimethyl ether. Ventilation. Physical State; Appearance Environmental effects of the substance have been adequately investigated, but no significant effects have been found. © ILO and WHO 2017. Manufactures, sup See Chemical Dangers. Separated from : see Chemical Dangers. Boiling point: 78°C Melting point: -114 °C Relative density (water = 1): 0.79 Solubility in water: miscibleVapour pressure, kPa at 20°C: 5.8 Relative vapour density (air = 1): 1.6 Relative density of the vapour/air-mixture at 20°C (air = 1): 1.03Flash point: 12.0 °C c.c.Auto-ignition temperature: 400°C Explosive limits, vol% in air: 3.1-27.7 Octanol/water partition coefficient as log Pow: -0.32 Viscosity: 1.074 mPa*s at 20°C. When the chemical compound is below the flash point, no flammable vapors are released. Refer immediately for medical attention. Can you ship Culinary Solvent to my state? This generates fire and explosion hazard. First rinse with plenty of water for several minutes (remove contact lenses if easily possible), then refer for medical attention. Rinse skin with plenty of water or shower. When the chemical compound is below the flash point, no flammable vapors are released. Highly flammable. The vapour mixes well with air, explosive mixtures are easily formed. Do NOT wash away into sewer. The substance defats the skin, which may cause dryness or cracking. In case of fire: keep drums, etc., cool by spraying with water. Unconsciousness. The vapour at high levels is irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. Ethanol consumption during pregnancy may adversely affect the unborn child. Give one or two glasses of water to drink. The substance can be absorbed into the body by inhalation of its vapour and by ingestion. Absorb remaining liquid in inert absorbent. Risk of fire and explosion on contact with incompatible substances. Protective gloves. Remove contaminated clothes. Physical dangers UN Hazard Class: 3; UN Pack Group: II, Prepared by an international group of experts on behalf of ILO and WHO, The higher the concentration of alcohol, the lower the flash point of the compound. Collect leaking and spilled liquid in covered containers as far as possible. Auto-ignition temperature: 400°C Explosive limits, vol% … ----- escape Ethanol is a 2-carbon alcohol. See Notes. Some state rules governing ethanol may instead reference the material as "a substance with a flash point below <>". Flash Point for Ethyl Alcohol and Water; vol % Flashpoint (Closed cup) 96 : 62 deg F (17 deg C) 95 : 63 deg F (17 deg C) 80 : 68 deg F (20 deg C) 70 : 70 deg F (21 deg C) 60 : 72 deg F (22 deg C) 50 : 75 deg F (24 deg C) 40 : 79 deg F (26 deg C) 30 : 85 deg F (29 deg C) 20 : 97 deg F (36 deg C) 10 : 120 deg F (49 deg C) 5 : 144 deg F (62 deg C) More information on fire safety codes and best practices: choosing a selection results in a full page refresh, press the space key then arrow keys to make a selection. The substance is severely irritating to the eyes. Its molecular formula is CH3CH2OH. Formula: CH3CH2OH / C2H6O Effects of long-term or repeated exposure NO open flames, NO sparks and NO smoking. Apron. UN Classification Boiling point: 78°C Melting point: -114 °C Relative density (water = 1): 0.79 Solubility in water: miscible Vapour pressure, kPa at 20°C: 5.8 Relative vapour density (air = 1): 1.6 Relative density of the vapour/air-mixture at 20°C (air = 1): 1.03 Flash point: 12.0 °C c.c. The flash point is an indication of how easy a chemical may burn. Rinse mouth. This may result in irritation, headache, fatigue and lack of concentration. Remove all ignition sources. Manufactures, suppliers, and the NFPA use the flash point measurement to determine a liquid's flammability rating and hazard class. Use ventilation, local exhaust or breathing protection. Fireproof. Reacts violently with strong oxidants such as nitric acid, silver nitrate, mercuric nitrate and magnesium perchlorate. Closed system, ventilation, explosion-proof electrical equipment and lighting. Dizziness. Protective clothing. An alternative notation is CH3−CH2−OH, which indicates that the carbon of a methyl group (CH3−) is attached to the carbon of a methylene group (−CH2–), which is attached to the oxygen of a hydroxyl group (−OH). Ethanol is sometimes abbreviated as EtOH, using the common organic chemistry notation of representing the ethyl group (C2H5−) with Et.