var d = new Date(); Can I Kick Him Out? And it was a great sandwich, full of unexpected flavors. It was early days in the “Baking With Julia” project. I’m only exaggerating a smidge when I say it took me so long that when I put down my knife, Julia had finished everything else, and we were ready to sit down to one of her favorite lunches: tuna salad on an English muffin. For decades, Julia was on the road more than she was home and, when she returned to her beloved kitchen, she craved simple foods. All rights reserved, (5-ounce) can tuna packed in oil, drained, tablespoons mayonnaise, preferably Hellmann’s, plus more for spreading, tablespoons finely chopped onion, preferably Vidalia, tablespoon capers, rinsed, patted dry and chopped if large, or 5 olives, pitted and chopped, tablespoons minced fresh chives or parsley (optional), toasted English muffins (preferably Bays) or 4 untoasted white bread slices, Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. All rights reserved. Her longtime assistant, Stephanie Hersh, said, “The rest was up for grabs.” Make it with capers, cornichons and chopped onion, a squirt of lemon juice and some herbs, serve it open-face on an English muffin or between slices of white bread, and you’ll have Julia’s midday signature. Sign up for InsideHook to get our best content delivered to your inbox every weekday. Writing the book was my job, and I was headed to Julia’s house in Cambridge, Mass., to sort out recipes and chapters. A few weeks ago, when I talked to Stephanie, who has since moved to New Zealand and become a culinary instructor for Oceania Cruise Lines, we had a good giggle over the sandwich. “Tuna-salad sandwiches were, indeed, among Julia’s favorites, but it turns out that she served them to guests for reasons that went beyond her liking them,” Greenspan writes. Taste and see if you'd like more mayo, onion or cornichons. For decades, Julia would be on the road almost as much as she was at home, and on tour, everyone wanted to show her their best — and often their richest and most complicated — dishes. I went over each element of the sandwich with Stephanie on our call, wanting to get it just the way Julia did it, and when we did, I thought, as I often do when I’m working on recipes, W.W.J.D. Chez Julia, the tuna was packed in oil, and the mayonnaise was always Hellmann’s. There was crunch from onion and (beautifully) chopped celery. Tuna-salad sandwiches were, indeed, among Julia’s favorites, but it turns out that she served them to guests for reasons that went beyond her liking them.

It’s certainly not the most elaborate recipe from Julia Child, but as we all find ourselves desperate for new lunch options and collecting new and exciting cans of fish while we’re stuck working from home, it may be the most useful: in a new article for the New York Times, Dorie Greenspan reveals the beloved cookbook author’s affinity for tuna sandwiches and offers up Child’s favorite recipe for the fishy staple. She Had a Headache for Months. Tuna-Salad Sandwich, Julia Child Style. —Dorie Greenspan, © Copyright 1992- “Oh, that sandwich was pure comfort for her,” Stephanie said. “As long as the tuna and mayo were good, the rest was up for grabs.” All these years later, when I fix a tuna-salad sandwich for my own working lunch, I think back to the fun of being with Julia in her kitchen, to the joy of sharing something simple with her and to my foolish worry about the celery. (It’s in the Smithsonian now.) Then She Could Barely See. And they have to be chopped just right. The woman who famously said, “If you don’t have butter, use cream,” loved good food and was always touched that someone wanted to cook for her, but when she got home, she craved simple food and seized what opportunities she had to enjoy it.

There was always lettuce, usually a soft lettuce, rounds of tomato and sometimes more onion (Vidalia was her first choice). But the tuna sandwich? Julia was the beloved cookbook author and television pioneer Julia Child, and the project was a television series and cookbook. Would she ever have had a real recipe for that? Put a leaf of lettuce on each muffin half, top with tuna salad and finish with tomato and onion. Yield 2 sandwiches; Time 10 minutes This was one of Julia Child’s favorite dishes for a working lunch. Tuna-salad sandwiches were, indeed, among Julia’s favorites, but it turns out that she served them to guests for reasons that went beyond her liking them. (Makes 1 1/2 cups.) Still, Child’s variation on the tuna sandwich goes beyond your typical deli fare. By continuing to use this website you are giving consent to cookies being used. document.getElementById("date_year").innerHTML = d.getFullYear(); Prepare the tuna salad: Using a fork, mash the tuna with 3 tablespoons mayonnaise. These days, I do what Julia would do: I never leave the celery out, but I never fuss over it either. ]]> If you’re using English muffins, do what Julia did: Make open-face sandwiches. It's free. Add the celery, as much onion and chopped cornichons as you’d like, and the capers or olives, and toss to combine.

: What Would Julia Do? Greenspan notes that she typically ate her tuna open-faced on an English muffin.

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“For decades, Julia would be on the road almost as much as she was at home, and on tour, everyone wanted to show her their best — and often their richest and most complicated — dishes. He’s a GOP Insider and Trump’s Friend. This was one of Julia Child’s favorite dishes for a working lunch. If you’re using sliced bread, prepare traditional sandwiches: Top each of 2 slices of bread with 1 piece lettuce, tomato and onion, then spread over the tuna and finish with remaining onion, tomato, lettuce and bread. Julia was a stickler for writing the perfect recipe, for testing it until it was foolproof — the best thing you could tell Julia was her recipe worked. This Tuna-Salad Sandwich Is Julia Child-Approved Lunch. Add more lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the chives or parsley, if you’re using either. [CDATA[// >